Bletchley Park

Bletchley Park


Once the top-secret home of the World War Two Code breakers, now a museum and vibrant heritage attraction.

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Visit Bletchley Park

Car journey time from London:

  • 1hr 40mins - 51 miles / 83 km

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    THE HISTORY OF BLETCHLEY PARK

    Bletchley Park is an English country house and estate in Bletchley, Milton Keynes that became the principal centre of Allied code-breaking during the Second World War. It is recognised and acknowledged worldwide for the achievements that took place here in World War Two, and how and why these remain relevant today.

    After the war, Bletchley Park became home to a variety of training schools: for teachers, Post Office workers, air traffic control system engineers, and members of GCHQ. In 1987, after a fifty-year association with British Intelligence, Bletchley Park was finally closed.

    There were moves to demolish the whole site in favour of housing development and a supermarket. In 1991 the Bletchley Archaeological and Historical Society formed a small committee with the aim of saving Bletchley Park in tribute to the remarkable people whose collective intellects changed the course of WW2, and so that the story could be kept alive for the education and enjoyment of future generations.

    BLETCHLEY PARK

    In 1992, the committee persuaded Milton Keynes Council to declare most of Bletchley Park a conservation area. The Bletchley Park Trust was formed and in 1994 its Chief Patron, HRH The Duke of Kent, opened the site to the public, as a museum.

    In June 1999 the Trust was awarded a 250 year leasehold of the core historic areas of the Park, and this was followed in 2009 by a successful bid for support from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Bletchley Park is now a self funding historic visitor attraction with over 250,000 visitors per year, and additional buildings continue to be restored and opened to the public.